Balance Exercises For Elderly

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impression balance exercises for elderly 1

Balance Exercises For Elderly

Exercise: Exercises to Try Balance Exercises To get all of the benefits of physical activity, try all four types of exercise — endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. This page addresses balance exercises. Important for Fall Prevention Click for more informationEach year, more than one-third of people age 65 or older fall. Falls and fall-related injuries, such as hip fracture, can have a serious impact on an older person’s life. If you fall, it could limit your activities or make it impossible to live independently. Balance exercises, along with certain strength exercises, can help prevent falls by improving your ability to control and maintain your body’s position, whether you are moving or still. Balance Exercises to TryThese 5 exercises that are shown below are aimed at improving your balance and your lower body strength. They include standing on one foot walking heel to toe balance walk back leg raises side leg raises Anywhere, AnytimeYou can do balance exercises almost anytime, anywhere, and as often as you like, as long as you have something sturdy nearby to hold on to if you become unsteady. In the beginning, using a chair or the wall for support will help you work on your balance safely. Balance exercises overlap with the lower body strength exercises, which also can improve your balance. Do the strength exercises — back leg raises, side leg raises, and hip extensions — two or more days per week, but not on any two days in a row. Safety Tips Have a sturdy chair or a person nearby to hold on to if you feel unsteady. Talk with your doctor if you are unsure about doing a particular exercise. Modify as You Progress Click for more informationThe exercises which follow can improve your balance even more if you modify them as you progress. Start by holding on to a sturdy chair for support. To challenge yourself, try holding on to the chair with only one hand; then with time, you can try holding on with only one finger, then no hands. If you are steady on your feet, try doing the exercise with your eyes closed. Balance Exercise – Standing on One Foot Click for more informationImprove your balance by standing on one foot. Stand on one foot behind a sturdy chair, holding on for balance. Hold position for up to 10 seconds. Repeat 10 to 15 times. Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg. Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg. Watch a video showing how standing on one foot is done. (After watching it, click on the back button to return to this page.) Balance Exercise – Walking Heel to Toe Click for more informationImprove your balance by walking heel to toe. Position the heel of one foot just in front of the toes of the other foot. Your heel and toes should touch or almost touch. Choose a spot ahead of you and focus on it to keep you steady as you walk. Take a step. Put your heel just in front of the toe of your other foot. Repeat for 20 steps. Watch a video showing how walking heel to toe is done. (After watching it, click on the back button to return to this page.) Balance Exercise – Balance Walk Click for more informationImprove your balance with the balance walk. Raise arms to sides, shoulder height. Choose a spot ahead of you and focus on it to keep you steady as you walk. Walk in a straight line with one foot in front of the other. As you walk, lift your back leg. Pause for 1 second before stepping forward. Repeat for 20 steps, alternating legs. Watch a video showing how a balance walk is done. (After watching it, click on the back button to return to this page.) Strength Exercise – Back Leg Raises Click for more informationStrengthen your buttocks and lower back with back leg raises. Stand behind a sturdy chair, holding on for balance. Breathe in slowly. Breathe out and slowly lift one leg straight back without bending your knee or pointing your toes. Try not to lean forward. The leg you are standing on should be slightly bent. Hold position for 1 second. Breathe in as you slowly lower your leg. Repeat 10 to 15 times. Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg. Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg. Watch a video showing how a back leg raise is done. (After watching it, click on the back button to return to this page.) Strength Exercise – Side Leg Raises Click for more informationStrengthen your hips, thighs, and buttocks with side leg raises. Stand behind a sturdy chair with feet slightly apart, holding on for balance. Breathe in slowly. Breathe out and slowly lift one leg out to the side. Keep your back straight and your toes facing forward. The leg you are standing on should be slightly bent. Hold position for 1 second. Breathe in as you slowly lower your leg. Repeat 10 to 15 times. Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg. Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg. Watch a video showing how a side leg raise is done. (After watching it, click on the back button to return to this page.)
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Balance Exercises For Elderly

Losing your balance is a part of life. It happens all the time. As we get older, however, things such as vision problems, inner ear problems, or weakened hips and ankles can throw off our balance more often. When young people get off balance, they can react quickly. Muscles kick in to stabilize us and we don’t fall down. But as we age, we have to work a little harder to keep those muscles strong. Janis McDonald is a certified functional aging specialist and master personal trainer. Janis, who is 65, understands seniors and helps other seniors stay active in her retirement community in San Miguel, Mexico. She operates the Website Livelikeyoucan.com and offers fitness coaching for boomers and beyond. Balance exercises can be an easy and fun part of everyday life, McDonald says. She shared these exercises that help her keep on the go. All of these exercises are good for the hips and ankles. McDonald suggests that you position yourself near a wall, chair, or counter before you start. That way you can catch yourself if you fall. Brushing Your Teeth Exercise McDonald’s favorite exercise is as simple as brushing your teeth. Stand by a flat tabletop or counter. Lift your right foot a bit. With your right arm, brush the upper left corner of your mouth (with a real or imagined toothbrush) for 30 seconds. Now put the toothbrush in your left hand, and raise your left foot. Brush the upper right corner of your mouth for 30 seconds. Switch again, putting the toothbrush in your right hand and lifting your left foot. Brush the lower left corner of your mouth. Repeat on the other side. Rock Around the Clock Exercise Stand straight with your feet together and your shoulders relaxed. Make your body rigid as a board. Begin to “rock around the clock,” as McDonald says. Begin to sway in a circle with your body. Sway for one minute in each direction. Marching Exercise Stand next to a chair or counter. Don’t hold on unless you need to. Alternate lifting one knee as high as possible, then the other knee as high as possible. Do this for one or two minutes, counting a long “one, two” each time you lift the knee. The Living Room Walk Walk slowly across your living room. While walking, slowly turn your head as far to the right as you can. Walk back to your starting point, slowly turning your head as far to the left as you can. Chair Exercise Sit in a chair that does not have arms. Cross your arms across your shoulders, left hand on right shoulder, and right hand on left shoulder. Stand up and sit down, keeping your head up and not looking down. Do not lean forward as you stand up. Heel-Toe Walk Try walking a few steps on your heels, then on your toes. Senior Balance Challenge McDonald says that there are many things you can buy to help with balance exercises, but for the most part, the best equipment is the floor. ”It’s functionally relevant. People are not going to walk down the street on a wobble board.” A high-density foam mat can be helpful, however. She likes to use the mat for what she calls the “senior balance challenge.” Here are the stages of the challenge. Stand for 30 seconds, eyes closed. Stand for 30 seconds, looking at the wall, on a high-density foam mat. Stand for 30 seconds, eyes closed, on high-density foam mat. “This can be very challenging for people 65 and older,” McDonald said of the final stage.
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Balance Exercises For Elderly

These simple balance exercises can be done at home to help improve your health and mobility. Don’t worry if you’ve not done much exercise for a while, these balance exercises are gentle and easy to follow.  If you’re not very active or not sure how to start, you may want to get the all-clear from a GP before starting. Wear loose, comfortable clothing and keep some water handy. Build up slowly and aim to gradually increase the repetitions of each exercise over time. Consider doing the exercises near a wall or a stable chair just in case you lose your balance. Try to do these exercises at least twice a week and combine them with the other routines in this series to help improve strength, balance and co-ordination. Download this exercise routine as a PDF (813kb) Sideways walking A. Stand with your feet together, knees slightly bent. B. Step sideways in a slow and controlled manner, moving one foot to the side first. C. Move the other to join it. Avoid dropping your hips as you step. Perform 10 steps each way or step from one side of the room to the other. Simple grapevine This involves walking sideways by crossing one foot over the other. A. Start by crossing your right foot over your left. B. Bring your left foot to join it. Attempt five cross steps on each side. If necessary, put your fingers against a wall for stability. The smaller the step, the more you work on your balance. Heel-to-toe walk A. Standing upright, place your right heel on the floor directly in front of your left toe. B. Then do the same with your left heel. Make sure you keep looking forward at all times. If necessary, put your fingers against a wall for stability. Try to perform at least five steps. As you progress, move away from the wall. One-leg stand A. Start by standing facing the wall, with arms outstretched and your fingertips touching the wall. B. Lift your left leg, keep your hips level and keep a slight bend in the opposite leg. Gently place your foot back on the floor. Hold the lift for 5 to 10 seconds and perform three on each side. Step-up Use a step, preferably with a railing or near a wall, to use as support. A. Step up with your right leg. B. Bring your left leg up to join it. C. Step down again and return to the start position. The key for building balance is to step up and down slowly and in a controlled manner. Perform up to five steps with each leg.

Balance Exercises For Elderly

Balance Exercises For Elderly
Balance Exercises For Elderly
Balance Exercises For Elderly
Balance Exercises For Elderly

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