Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

bicep tendonitis exercises 1
image bicep tendonitis exercises 1

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

There are four basic types of bicep tendon injuries. The first is known as tendinitis (acute)/tendinosis (chronic) which usually occurs or is brought about from overuse or in proper biomechanical wear. The second is bicep tendon dislocations. The third is the bicep tendon tear. Lastly is the bicep tendon impingement syndrome. Biceps Anatomy & Movement The bicep has two heads and runs from the area above the shoulder joint to the area below the elbow joint. It is a true two joint muscle. Many people are surprised to know that the bicep not only curls/flexes the elbow, but also is involved with elevation of the upper arm. To properly use the bicep in a curl you must begin with your arms extended to the thigh. As you begin to raise the arms and curl the weight, begin to elevate the front upper arms so that the bar finally touches your forehead. Do not bend your forehead down to touch the bar; rather bring your arms forward and upward towards your head. The short head of the bicep is also involved in supination of the wrist. This is observable with your arm outstretched forward with your thumb pointing up towards the ceiling, then rotate your thumb away from the midline of your body and return it to an upright position. You will see the bicep slightly contract as you perform this motion. Tendinitis & Tendinosis Tendinitis is a condition associated with overuse and is usually less than two weeks of duration. Using ice and some anti-inflammatories and rest will result in the body recovering from this type of injury. Tendon Irritation The chronic form of the tendon irritation is best treated with light activity and heat to promote local circulation throughout the affected area. Most tendons respond very well to the use of local topical treatments designed to bring additional circulation to that area. Using alfalfa in a tablet form has been a long-term “home remedy” to many athletes. Other treatments to the bicep may include electric stimulation, cross-frictional massage, ultrasound, and laser just to mention a few. Using NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) will result in additional damage to any chronic tendon problem. They do this by removing the sulfur necessary for the collagen formation associated with tendon repair. Adhesions Adhesions often play a role in the bicep tendon injuries. They can mimic bicep tendon injury by creating pain with any movement. Adhesions often times occur in muscles and can complicate any common type of tendon injury. Adhesions are usually removable with full range of motion exercises and in some cases deep tissue massage. Sometimes arthroscopic surgery is necessary to remove significant damage from the tendon surface. Improper muscle strain and flexibility will produce imbalances associated with the shoulder joint and also with the bicep tendon. Basic muscle test performed by a licensed physician and/or physical therapists will often reveal this type of problem. These lead to abnormal biomechanical forces that result in tendinopathy. Biceps Tendon Tears Biceps tendon tears will often occur due to trauma or extremely heavy lifting. Many biceps have been torn off by individuals during deadlifts. Some of these conditions will require surgery and general medication to prevent infection. “Biceps tendon tears will often occur due to trauma or extremely heavy lifting.” The increase of various foods such as onions, garlic and other foods high in sulfur will aid in tendon tear prevention. Some individuals, who use excessive antibiotics prior to a tear, will result in weakening of the tissue. Fluoro quinolones such as Cipro, are commonly associated with tendon tears and should be avoided whenever possible. Just simply remind the doctor that you are actively lifting weights and wish to avoid any type of antibiotic that may weaken your tendons. The effects of antibiotics on your tendons can last up to 6 months before any injury will occur. It is common to see this type of injury in men between the ages of 16 to 45 years of age. Tendon Impingement Syndrome RELATED POLL
bicep tendonitis exercises 1

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

Biceps tendonitis commonly presents with decreased extensibility of the upper arm musculature. An essential component of a biceps tendonitis rehab program is to increase muscle elasticity and pain-free range of motion at the joint. Gentle stretching exercises should be initiated when acute pain symptoms have subsided. Commonly prescribed exercises include the towel stretch, flexed-elbow pull and biceps stretch. Each stretch should be held for 10 to 15 seconds and performed approximately six times. In order to prevent further injury, always perform a five- to 10-minute warm-up prior to stretching and stay within pain limits.
bicep tendonitis exercises 2

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

Biceps tendonitis is an inflammation of the upper part of the biceps tendon where it attaches to the shoulder. Symptoms typically manifest in the form of pain and weakness localized to the front of the shoulder and upper arm. It is commonly treated with rest, medication and rehab exercises. If you suffer from biceps tendonitis, consult your physical therapist to design a rehab program best suited for you.
bicep tendonitis exercises 3

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

Weak musculature, overuse and intense physical activity have been known to cause biceps tendonitis. Strengthening exercises are prescribed to condition the musculature and alleviate symptoms while preventing future injury. Progressive strengthening exercises should be initiated when acute pain symptoms have subsided. They should focus on increasing the strength of the biceps, shoulder and arm musculature. Typical strengthening exercises include biceps curls, triceps extensions, shoulder internal rotations, shoulder external rotations and rows. Perform approximately two to three sets of 10 to 15 repetitions for each exercise. In order to prevent injury, perform strengthening exercises after warming up and stay within pain limits.
bicep tendonitis exercises 4

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

The biceps muscle is responsible for bending the elbow against resistance and assisting with arm elevation activities. During contraction of the biceps, tension is placed through the long head of biceps tendon. When this tension is excessive due to too much repetition or high force, damage to the biceps tendon may occur. Bicep tendonitis (long head) is a condition whereby there is damage to the long head of biceps tendon with subsequent degeneration and often swelling. This may occur traumatically due to a high force going through the biceps tendon beyond what it can withstand, or, more commonly, due to gradual wear and tear associated with overuse.
bicep tendonitis exercises 5

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

Bicep tendonitis most commonly occurs due to repetitive or prolonged activities placing strain on the biceps tendon. This typically occurs due to excessive lifting (especially overhead), arm elevation activities (e.g. putting the washing on the line), heavy pushing or pulling, stretching the arm behind your back, throwing sports, sleeping on the affected side or use of the arm in front of the body (e.g. housework).

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

The symptoms of bicep tendonitis usually develop gradually over a period of time. Often, the pain associated with this condition is experienced as an ache in the front of the shoulder that increases to a sharper pain or catching pain with certain activities. Occasionally, pain may also be experienced in the upper arm, upper back or neck.
bicep tendonitis exercises 7

Bicep Tendonitis Exercises

In patients with minor bicep tendonitis, little or no symptoms may be present. Some patients may experience pain on commencing activity that reduces as they warm up. These patients are usually able to continue sport or activity only to have an increase in pain, ache or stiffness upon resting later (particularly that night or the following morning). In severe or chronic cases the pain may be disabling, preventing the patient from performing further activity. Muscle wasting, weakness and night pain (regardless of position) may also be present.
bicep tendonitis exercises 8

Patients with bicep tendonitis will usually experience pain or difficulty when lifting heavy objects (especially overhead). Pain may also increase when performing overhead activities, elevating the affected arm, using the arm in front of the body, during heavy pushing or pulling, when lying on the affected side, when taking the arm behind the back or across the body or during throwing. Tenderness on firmly touching the front of the shoulder (long head of biceps tendon – figure 1) is also typically present.
bicep tendonitis exercises 9

A thorough subjective and objective examination from a physiotherapist is usually sufficient to diagnose bicep tendonitis. Occasionally, further investigations such as an ultrasound, X-ray or MRI scan may be required to assist with diagnosis and assess the severity of the condition.
bicep tendonitis exercises 10

The primary objective of a biceps tendonitis exercise program is to allow for return to sport or normal activity in a timely and safe manner. Returning to your recreational activity prematurely can worsen the injury and result in long-term damage. Activity-specific exercises can be initiated once an individual is near full recovery. Recovery rate varies by individual and is based upon healing of the tendon as opposed to the amount of time that has elapsed. Full recovery is characterized by normal range of motion, lack of pain and biceps strength comparable to the uninjured arm. When this is achieved, you may engage in exercises specific to your recreational activity of choice. Begin by breaking down components of the activity and slowly progressing to your previous activity level. It is still essential to perform your strengthening and stretching program at this point in order to prevent an exacerbation.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*