Fiction Writing Exercises

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Fiction Writing Exercises

3 Fiction Writing Exercises Posted by Melissa Donovan on August 18, 2016 · Fiction writing exercises for story development. Fiction writing exercises can help you discover storytelling techniques and provide ideas and inspiration for your fiction writing projects. These exercises provide practice and experience for young or new writers. For more experienced writers, these exercises offer inspiration and can help you see a story from a fresh perspective. Today’s fiction writing exercises are carefully chosen to help you develop some of the most critical components in a story. If you can create a few characters; identify a conflict, climax, and resolution; and choose a theme, you’re well on your way to writing a short story or novel that will resonate with readers. Read More Filed under Fiction Writing Exercises · Tagged with Fiction Writing · 9 Comments
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Fiction Writing Exercises

Fiction Writing Exercises: Becoming the Antagonist Posted by Melissa Donovan on February 14, 2017 · Fiction writing exercises for crafting an antagonist. Today’s fiction writing exercises are designed to help fiction writers gain a better understanding of their characters, including antagonists, by learning how to relate to contradictory or opposing viewpoints. Remember, an antagonist is not necessarily a villain. An antagonist is anyone whose purpose is at odds with the protagonist’s goals. The most effective characters are unique and complex, not cardboard cutouts of ourselves. That means we have to get into the heads of people who are strikingly different from us. These fiction writing exercises will help you do just that. The idea is to try and view the world from a perspective that is completely different from your own. Read More Filed under Fiction Writing Exercises · Tagged with Fiction Writing · 4 Comments
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Fiction Writing Exercises

Fiction Writing Exercises for Creating Characters Posted by Melissa Donovan on November 17, 2016 · Create characters with these fiction writing exercises. Whenever I’m working on a story idea, I spend a lot of time during the development stages making character sketches and writing backstories for my characters. I usually end up with too many of them, so some characters get cut. The lucky ones get resurrected in some other story. Some of my favorite stories are plot-driven, but character-driven stories tend to resonate with me on a deeper level, which is why I believe that regardless of plot, stories with strong and compelling character arcs are the best. They start with a character who wants something, and we see the character through conflict after conflict until he or she emerges changed, usually stronger and for the better. Read More Filed under Fiction Writing Exercises · Tagged with · 9 Comments
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Get daily creative writing prompts for your short story, fiction or nonfiction novel, essay and more at WritersDigest.com. writing prompts, creative writing prompts, expository writing prompts, writing prompt Need an idea to help you get started writing? You’ll find hundreds of fun writing prompts here – perfect for beginning a new novel or short story, or simply giving your writing muscle a workout.
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The Time Is Now offers a weekly writing prompt (we’ll post a poetry prompt on Tuesdays, a fiction prompt on Wednesdays, and a creative nonfiction prompt on Thursdays) to help you stay committed to your writing practice throughout the year. We also offer a selection of books on writing—both the newly published and the classics—that we recommend you check out for inspiration, plus advice and insight on the writing process from the authors profiled in Poets & Writers Magazine. And don’t miss Writers Recommend, which includes books, art, music, writing prompts, films—anything and everything—that has inspired other authors in their writing.
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I use these exercises in classes to find stories. I assign eight or ten of them over the first few weeks of class (asking students to write about a consistent set of characters and a place, without trying to write a story). After the class has looked at these exercises, we try to find, from a handful of the exercises, or sometimes from just one, the most interesting possible story that is developing. The rest of the course is devoted to connecting the dots between these fragments of story. Here are some reviews of the book. To see the full introduction to this book, click here. And here’s a list of all of the exercises in the book.
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Get daily creative writing prompts for your short story, fiction or nonfiction novel, essay and more at WritersDigest.com. writing prompts, creative writing prompts, expository writing prompts, writing prompt
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Some writers don’t think much about setting. They know exactly where their story takes place, and the setting emerges naturally through the writing. But sometimes, a poorly established setting is unclear or confusing. Do you pay heed to setting? Do you work it out before you start your first draft? If you know of any other great fiction writing exercises that focus on setting, be sure to share them in the comments. And keep writing!
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There are two sides to setting: place and time. If you’re writing a contemporary novel, the time in which your story is set is relatively straightforward. However, if you’re writing historical fiction, futuristic fiction, or a story that includes time travel, you’ll need to make sure readers always know what time it is.
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Today’s fiction writing exercises are carefully chosen to help you develop some of the most critical components in a story. If you can create a few characters; identify a conflict, climax, and resolution; and choose a theme, you’re well on your way to writing a short story or novel that will resonate with readers. Read More
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In his book, Save the Cat, Blake Snyder recommends writing a logline for your story before you tackle the first draft. Today we’re going to apply this concept with fiction writing exercises that force you to dig into your story and unearth its core, so you can find out what it’s really about and whether it’s a compelling concept.
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The first thing you must do is step away from your primary working space. Changing your environment prepares your mind for the writing exercises you’re about to complete so a fresh perspective can be obtained. You can go down to the local coffee shop, sit outside on your back porch, or move to a different room. Once you’re in a new space, you can try one of these writing exercises to keep your creativity fresh.
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7. Underground History. Reread your own older fiction—one story or as many as you want to. Find the ten most common words from this fiction (excluding small and uninteresting words). Use these words as hidden titles for ten paragraphs of prose. By hidden, I mean that you should operate as in the above exercise, but after several rough drafts, eliminate the titles. Choosing these ten words is obviously going to be somewhat subjective, unless you have a program that allows you to do some of the work for you (for instance, you could pick a word that seems to occur commonly, then do a MS Word global search—the find icon under edit). This exercise may help you uncover the trends and unexpected subject matter of your fiction.
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If you are a teacher, and you want to order an examination copy of The 3 A. M. Epiphany, click here. And here’s a site in Britain to order the book.  I’m always glad to answer any questions about the book or this selection of exercises (the exercises below are quite condensed versions of the ones in The 3 A. M. Epiphany).  If you use this page for a class, there’s no need to ask for permission, but I would love to hear how the exercises work—or don’t work. My email address is bkiteley@du.edu.
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Some people say that everything has been written, every story told. But that’s not true. There’s always another angle, a different perspective that can be explored. And writers have all the tools they need to grab that perspective and run with it. You just need a starting point, and these fiction writing exercises can help you find it. Try starting with a song.
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Throughout history, great artists have collaborated and mixed media to come up with fresh takes on ancient truths. These fiction writing exercises provide a new source for inspiration, get you working in collaboration with other artists (musicians), and give you creative license to put a new spin on something that’s been around for a while.
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Fiction writing exercises like the one below will help you pinpoint areas where excessive wording is creating a problem. In addition, it will peel away the layers of your story, revealing its core. Plus, it’s a very simple exercise and can be completed rather quickly.
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The Time Is Now offers weekly writing prompts in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction to help you stay committed to your writing practice throughout the year. Sign up to get The Time Is Now, as well as a weekly book recommendation for guidance and inspiration, delivered to your inbox.

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