Knee Rehab Exercises

knee rehab exercises 1
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Knee Rehab Exercises

Knee Exercises & Knee Rehabilitation We have also categorised them into early, mid and late stage exercises although this is only a guide and we recommend seeking professional advice. Exercises for specific injuries:Hamstring strain, Patellofemoral pain syndrome and ACL injury Q Angle of the Knee Explained The Q angle of the knee is a measurement of the angle between the quadriceps muscles and the patella tendon and provides useful information about the alignment of the knee joint. Vastus Medialis Oblique Rehab VMO stands for vastus medialis oblique and is part of the vastus medialis quadriceps muscle at the front of the thigh. Here we explain why strengthening this muscle is so important for knee rehabilitation. Knee Mobility Exercises These exercises are often done as soon as possible after injury if pain will allow. The aim is to restore range of motion without putting any damaged tissues under stress. The exact exercises and how quickly you progress through will depend on the type and severity of injury. Active mobility exercises where the athlete physically attempts to move the joint through a range of motion are often the first step. Early stage knee exercises These exercises are done as soon as pain allows. In some cases within a day or so of injury after the acute stage. Mid stage knee exercises During the mid stage exercises progress to gentle strengthening, gradually increasing the load on the joint and through the recovering tissues. Balance and proprioception training usually begins. Advanced knee exercises Late stage or advanced knee exercises are more functional and sports specific. The aim is to restore full strength and mobility to the joint and return the athlete to full training and competition.
knee rehab exercises 1

Knee Rehab Exercises

Overview Exercises you perform prior to knee replacement surgery can strengthen your knee, improve flexibility, and help you recover faster. There are numerous exercises you can do at home. But it’s important to speak to your surgeon and physical therapist before you start any new exercise regimen. Jamie Nelson, PT, DPT, offers insights into how you can strengthen your muscles before surgery. Doing these exercises will allow rehab to go more quickly and effectively. Begin with five to 10 repetitions of each exercise twice a day the first week, then increase to 10 to 15 repetitions by week two, and finally move up to 15 to 20 repetitions by week three. Advertisement Advertisement Thigh squeezes 1. Thigh squeezes This exercise helps build the quadriceps muscle that attaches to the knee. Lie on your back. Tighten the muscles in the front of your thigh by pushing the back of your knee down toward the floor or bed. Hold for 5 seconds and then release. Perform up to 3 sets of 5 to 20 repetitions. Side-lying straight leg raises 2. Side-lying straight leg raises This exercise is crucial in building your hip abductor muscles located in the buttocks. These muscles stabilize your pelvis while you are standing and walking. Lie on your side. Lift your leg straight up toward the ceiling to a distance of about 1 1/2 to 2 feet from your other leg. Lower your leg and repeat. Perform up to 3 sets of 10. Lie on your back and place your problem leg flat on the floor or bed while bending the other leg. Raise your straightened leg up about 12 inches and hold it there for 5 seconds. Slowly lower your leg. Perform up to 3 sets of 5 to 20 repetitions. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Straight leg raises 3. Straight leg raises These leg raises will help build your quadriceps and hip flexor muscles. This is especially important for regaining movement after surgery. Clamshells 4. Clamshells This works the external rotators and part of your abductors. Both are important for early ambulation and balance. Lie on your side with the damaged knee pointed toward the ceiling. Keeping your heels together, open and close your legs like a clamshell. Perform up to 3 sets of 5 to 20 repetitions. Advertisement Advertisement Knee bending 5. Knee bending This helps maintain your range of motion prior to your surgery. Sit in a stable chair and bend your knee back as far as possible. Hold it for 5 seconds and then return it to the resting position. Perform up to 3 sets of 5 to 20 repetitions. Advertisement Sitting kicks 6. Sitting kicks This helps strengthen the quadriceps muscle through its full range of motion. Sit in a stable chair and raise your leg until it’s straight. Hold the position for 5 seconds. Slowly lower your leg. Perform up to 3 sets of 5 to 20 repetitions. Advertisement Advertisement Chair pushup 7. Chair pushup This will help strengthen your triceps so they can hold you up when you don’t have the use of both legs after surgery. Sit in a sturdy chair with arms. Grasp the arms of the chair and push down on them while raising your body and straightening your arms and elbows. Slowly lower yourself back onto the chair. This will help strengthen your triceps so they can hold you up when you don’t have the use of both legs after surgery. Lying kicks 8. Lying kicks Lie on the floor or a bed and place a rolled blanket or large can under your problematic knee. Straighten your leg and the knee and hold the position for 5 seconds. Slowly lower your leg down and rest. Make sure the back of your knee stays in contact with the object the entire time and the small of your back remains on the floor. This exercise also helps strengthen the quadriceps muscle. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Stomach kickbacks 9. Stomach kickbacks This helps strengthen your hamstrings and the gluteal muscles in your butt. These muscles are important for getting in and out of chairs and cars. Lie on your stomach with your leg straight and then slowly bring your whole leg toward the ceiling. Hold for 2-3 seconds. Slowly lower your leg. Standing on one leg 10. Standing on one leg with support This exercise is crucial for maintaining balance and reducing the risk of falls. Perform this exercise as many times as you can per day. Place yourself in front of a countertop or waist-level bar. Hold onto the bar and stand on your affected leg for 30 seconds. Make sure to squeeze your gluteal muscles (in your butt) together to engage your abductors. Bottom line Bottom line Spend at least 15 minutes twice a day doing these exercises. Your ability to build up strength in the muscles around your knee prior to the surgery will greatly impact the speed and quality of your recovery.
knee rehab exercises 2

Knee Rehab Exercises

Begin with the basic knee strengthening exercises. Once these are too easy, they can be replaced with the intermediate knee strengthening exercises and eventually, the advanced knee strengthening exercises. Once the advanced exercises are too easy, progress to the knee strengthening exercises at the gym for optimal gains in knee function, strength and conditioning.
knee rehab exercises 3

Knee Rehab Exercises

Slide 1/12 Is It Safe for Me to Exercise? Do you worry that working out could cause more knee damage or pain? As long as your doctor says it’s OK, the best thing you can do is to strengthen the muscles that support your knee and keep them flexible. Start slowly, and build up over time. Slide 2/12 Warm Up First You can ride a stationary bike for about 5 minutes, take a brisk 2-minute walk while pumping your arms, or do 15-20 wall push-ups followed by the same number of calf raises. Doing this will help you get more out of your workout, prepare you to stretch, and lower your risk of an injury. Slide 3/12 1. Straight Leg Raises If your knee’s not at its best, start with a simple strengthening exercise for your quadriceps, the muscles in the front of the thigh. This move puts little to no strain on the knee. Lie on your back on the floor or another flat surface. Bend one knee and place your foot flat on the floor. Keeping the other leg straight, raise it to the height of the opposite knee. Repeat 10-15 times for three sets. Slide 4/12 2. Hamstring Curls These are the muscles along the back of your thigh. Lie flat on your stomach. Slowly bring your heels as close to your butt as you can, and hold that position. Do three sets of 15. You can also do this exercise standing while you hold onto a chair and lift one leg at a time. If this becomes easy, you can add ankle weights, slowly increasing the weight from 1 to 3 to 5 pounds. Slide 5/12 3. Prone Straight Leg Raises Lie on your stomach with your legs straight. Tighten the muscles in your bottom and the hamstring of one leg, and lift toward the ceiling. Hold 3-5 seconds, lower, and repeat. Do 10-15 lifts and switch sides. You can add ankle weights as you gain strength. You shouldn’t feel back pain. If you do, limit how high you lift up. If it still hurts, stop and talk to your doctor. Slide 6/12 4. Wall Squats This is a more-advanced move. You’ll keep your feet on the floor. Stand with your back against a wall, your feet about shoulder-width apart. Slowly bend your knees, and keep your back and pelvis against the wall. Hold for 5-10 seconds. Don’t bend too deeply. If you feel pressure or discomfort in your knees, adjust your position. Repeat the exercise, and try to hold the sit position a few seconds longer each time. Slide 7/12 5. Calf Raises Stand facing the back of a sturdy chair, other support such as the back of a couch, or a wall bar at the gym. You can also do this on the stairs, holding on to the banister with your heels hanging off the edge of the step. Slowly raise the heels as high as you can, then lower. Do three sets of 10-15. When it becomes easy, lift one foot slightly off the floor, with all your weight on the other foot. Slide 8/12 6. Step-Ups Place one foot on a step bench, platform, or the lowest step on a staircase.  Keeping your pelvis level, bend your knee and slowly lower the opposite foot to the floor. Lightly touch your toe to the floor, then rise back up. Repeat 10-15 times, then switch legs. Too easy? Use a higher step, or touch your heel instead of your toe. Slide 9/12 7. Side Leg Raises Lie on one side with your legs stacked. Bend the bottom leg for support. Straighten the top leg and raise it to 45 degrees. Hold for 5 seconds, lower and relax briefly, then repeat 10-15 times. Switch sides and start over. Want to try a bit of a different spin on the move? Point the toe of your upper leg slightly toward the floor as you raise it. Slide 10/12 8. Leg Presses Sit on a leg-press machine with your back and head against the support and your feet flat on the foot plate. Adjust the seat back so it’s comfortable. Slowly push the plate away from you until your legs are extended. Bend your knees and return to your starting position. Do three sets of 10-15 reps. (Ask a gym staff member for assistance the first time you do this.) Slide 11/12 No-No’s for Your Knee Exercise should never cause pain or make it worse. Remember: Muscle soreness after a hard workout is normal. But sharp, shooting, or sudden pain in the muscles or joints means you should stop and check with your doctor. Slide 12/12 Knee-Friendly Cardio Gentle is good. So, skip high-impact activities such as running or intense aerobics. Notice what feels right for you. For example, some people love elliptical machines, but others don’t. Swimming, jogging in water, or water aerobics are perfect. Your body in water weighs one-sixth of what it does on land.

Knee Rehab Exercises

Knee Rehab Exercises
Knee Rehab Exercises
Knee Rehab Exercises

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