Lower Ab Exercises

lower ab exercises 2
graphic lower ab exercises 2

Lower Ab Exercises

Share via facebook dialogShare via TwitterShare via PinterestShare via facebook dialogShare via TwitterShare via PinterestShare via PinterestBranislav Jovanović / Stocksy ; Graphic by Margaret FlatleyThere are endless ways to work your abs, but lower-ab exercises are usually the hardest to come by. The upper abs and obliques tend to get all the love from many popular exercises while the lower abs are harder to target. But you can (and should) share the burn among the muscles of your core.Here’s why: If a portion of your core is weak, this can cause other areas to become overactive as they try take on more of the work, Jason Loebig, Nike trainer and ambassador for HI-VIBE, a Chicago-based superfood juicery, tells SELF. Your hips and lower back are particularly vulnerable to taking over, especially if you spend a good part of your day at a desk. “As a result of sitting with poor posture for lengthy periods of time, the hip flexors and lower back may suffer,” says Loebig. “A strong core, specifically the ability to maintain a small amount of tension in the abs while sitting, helps to relieve tight hips and lower back pain by keeping the spine and pelvis in the correct posture position,” he says. So, even if you’ve got strong upper abs and obliques, strengthening your lower abs is important for making sure your core is putting in all the work it should.To get familiar with where your lower abs are and how to engage them (along with the rest of your core), Loebig recommends a simple breathing exercise. “Start laying down on your back and take some deep breaths through the belly. If you put your right hand on your chest and your left hand on your belly, your left hand should be rising and falling. Each time you exhale, you want to engage your abs like you're going to take a punch to the gut.”This starts to warm up your core, so you can bring on the real work, no matter what type of abs exercises you're doing. Try these nine lower-ab exercises to get your whole core working more efficiently.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman1V-UpLie face up with arms and legs extended and resting on the floor.Keep abs tight and lift hands and feet to meet over torso, rolling your core as you sit up.Lower your arms and legs back to the floor.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman2Half BurpeeStart standing in a quarter squat. Bend down and place your palms on the ground and jump feet back so that you're in high plank position.Immediately jump feet forward so they land on the outside of your hands.Lift your chest up to return to the starting position. Move directly into the next rep.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman3Plank JacksStart in high plank.Keeping your core engaged, jump your feet out and in (like jumping jacks).Share via PinterestValerie Fischel4Boat PoseSit with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Grasp your legs under your thighs, right above your knees.Lean back slightly. Lift your feet off the floor so that your shins are parallel to the floor.Extend your arms straight out in front of you at shoulder height, with palms facing down.Straighten and raise your legs toward the ceiling until your body forms a V shape (as shown). Hold this position.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman5Scissor SwitchStart on your back with your legs straight and arms reaching over head.Extend the right leg as you curl up off the shoulder blades and reach for the left calf or thigh. Staying in a curled position, core engaged, while repeatedly switching legs.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman6Plank HopsBegin in high plank with the feet together.Tighten abs, and jump your feet to the right, bringing your knees toward your right elbow.Jump your feet back to plank, and then jump feet out to the left. Continue alternating sides.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman7Mountain ClimbersStart in high plank and draw your right knee under your torso, keeping the toes off the ground.Return your right foot to starting position.Switch legs and bring your left knee under your chest. Keep switching legs as if you're running in place.For extra obliques work, do mountain climber twists—simply bring each knee to the opposite elbow.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman8Warrior BalanceStand on your left foot and lift your right knee to hip height in front of your body.Reach your torso forward as you extend your right leg behind you. Keep your standing leg slightly bent as your torso becomes parallel with the floor. Extend your arms overhead to help with balance.Pause for a second, then reverse the movement.Switch standing legs and repeat.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman9Down Dog AbsStart in down dog and lift your right leg into the air, this is your down dog split position (also known as three-legged down dog).Bring your right knee under your torso. Pause then extend right leg back to down dog split.Now bring your right knee to meet your right elbow. Pause then extend right leg back to down dog split.Finally, bring your right knee across your torso to meet your left elbow. Pause then extend right leg back to down dog split.Repeat the same sequence on the other leg.Share via facebook dialogShare via TwitterShare via PinterestKeywordsab exercises, jason loebig

Lower Ab Exercises

Share via facebook dialogShare via TwitterShare via PinterestShare via PinterestBranislav Jovanović / Stocksy ; Graphic by Margaret FlatleyThere are endless ways to work your abs, but lower-ab exercises are usually the hardest to come by. The upper abs and obliques tend to get all the love from many popular exercises while the lower abs are harder to target. But you can (and should) share the burn among the muscles of your core.Here’s why: If a portion of your core is weak, this can cause other areas to become overactive as they try take on more of the work, Jason Loebig, Nike trainer and ambassador for HI-VIBE, a Chicago-based superfood juicery, tells SELF. Your hips and lower back are particularly vulnerable to taking over, especially if you spend a good part of your day at a desk. “As a result of sitting with poor posture for lengthy periods of time, the hip flexors and lower back may suffer,” says Loebig. “A strong core, specifically the ability to maintain a small amount of tension in the abs while sitting, helps to relieve tight hips and lower back pain by keeping the spine and pelvis in the correct posture position,” he says. So, even if you’ve got strong upper abs and obliques, strengthening your lower abs is important for making sure your core is putting in all the work it should.To get familiar with where your lower abs are and how to engage them (along with the rest of your core), Loebig recommends a simple breathing exercise. “Start laying down on your back and take some deep breaths through the belly. If you put your right hand on your chest and your left hand on your belly, your left hand should be rising and falling. Each time you exhale, you want to engage your abs like you're going to take a punch to the gut.”This starts to warm up your core, so you can bring on the real work, no matter what type of abs exercises you're doing. Try these nine lower-ab exercises to get your whole core working more efficiently.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman1V-UpLie face up with arms and legs extended and resting on the floor.Keep abs tight and lift hands and feet to meet over torso, rolling your core as you sit up.Lower your arms and legs back to the floor.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman2Half BurpeeStart standing in a quarter squat. Bend down and place your palms on the ground and jump feet back so that you're in high plank position.Immediately jump feet forward so they land on the outside of your hands.Lift your chest up to return to the starting position. Move directly into the next rep.Share via PinterestWhitney Thielman3Plank JacksStart in high plank.Keeping your core engaged, jump your feet out and in (like jumping jacks).
lower ab exercises 2

Lower Ab Exercises

Share via facebook dialogShare via TwitterShare via PinterestShare via PinterestBranislav Jovanović / Stocksy ; Graphic by Margaret FlatleyThere are endless ways to work your abs, but lower-ab exercises are usually the hardest to come by. The upper abs and obliques tend to get all the love from many popular exercises while the lower abs are harder to target. But you can (and should) share the burn among the muscles of your core.Here’s why: If a portion of your core is weak, this can cause other areas to become overactive as they try take on more of the work, Jason Loebig, Nike trainer and ambassador for HI-VIBE, a Chicago-based superfood juicery, tells SELF. Your hips and lower back are particularly vulnerable to taking over, especially if you spend a good part of your day at a desk. “As a result of sitting with poor posture for lengthy periods of time, the hip flexors and lower back may suffer,” says Loebig. “A strong core, specifically the ability to maintain a small amount of tension in the abs while sitting, helps to relieve tight hips and lower back pain by keeping the spine and pelvis in the correct posture position,” he says. So, even if you’ve got strong upper abs and obliques, strengthening your lower abs is important for making sure your core is putting in all the work it should.To get familiar with where your lower abs are and how to engage them (along with the rest of your core), Loebig recommends a simple breathing exercise. “Start laying down on your back and take some deep breaths through the belly. If you put your right hand on your chest and your left hand on your belly, your left hand should be rising and falling. Each time you exhale, you want to engage your abs like you're going to take a punch to the gut.”This starts to warm up your core, so you can bring on the real work, no matter what type of abs exercises you're doing. Try these nine lower-ab exercises to get your whole core working more efficiently.

Lower Ab Exercises

Lower Ab Exercises
Lower Ab Exercises
Lower Ab Exercises
Lower Ab Exercises

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