Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

why do muscles hurt after exercise 1
impression why do muscles hurt after exercise 1

Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

Have you ever felt sore after starting a new activity or pushing yourself harder than usual during a workout? Muscle pain that shows up a day or two after exercising can affect anyone, regardless of your fitness level. But don’t be put off. This type of muscle stiffness or achiness is normal, doesn’t last long, and is actually a sign of your improving fitness. Dr Jonathan Folland, an expert in neuromuscular physiology from Loughborough University, explains how to avoid sore muscles after exercise. Why do my muscles feel sore after exercising? Sore muscles after physical activity, known as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), can occur when you start a new exercise programme, change your exercise routine, or increase the duration or intensity of your regular workout. When muscles are required to work harder than they’re used to, or in a different way, it is believed to cause microscopic damage to the muscle fibres, resulting in muscle soreness or stiffness. DOMS is often mistakenly believed to be caused by lactic acid build up, however, lactic acid is not involved in this process. Who can DOMS affect? Anyone can develop DOMS, even those who have been exercising for years, including elite athletes. DOMS can be alarming for people who are new to exercise and it may dent their initial enthusiasm to get fit. The good news is that the pain will decrease as your muscles get used to the new physical demands being placed upon them. The soreness is part of an adaptation process that leads to greater stamina and strength as the muscles recover and build. Unless you push yourself hard, you’re unlikely to develop DOMS after your next exercise session. What type of activities can cause DOMS? Any movement you’re not used to can cause DOMS, in particular, movements that cause the muscle to contract while it lengthens (called eccentric muscle contractions). Examples of eccentric muscle contractions include going down stairs, jogging or running downhill, lowering weights (such as the lowering phase of a bicep curl) and the downward motion of squats and push-ups. How long does DOMS last for? DOMS typically lasts between three and five days. The pain, which can range from mild to severe, usually occurs one or two days after the exercise. This sort of muscle pain should not be confused with any kind of pain you might experience during exercise, such as the acute, sudden and sharp pain of an injury, such as muscle strains or sprains. How can I treat DOMS? There is no one simple way to treat DOMS. Nothing is proven to be 100% effective. Treatments such as ice packs, massage, tender-point acupressure, anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, and rest may help ease some of the symptoms. DOMS doesn’t generally require medical intervention. However, seek medical advice if the pain becomes debilitating, or you experience heavy swelling or if your urine becomes dark. How can I prevent DOMS? One of the best ways to prevent DOMS is to start any new activity programme gently and gradually. Allowing the muscle time to adapt to new movements should help minimise soreness. There is little evidence that warming-up will be effective in preventing DOMS. However, exercising with warmed-up muscles will reduce your chance of injury and improve your performance. While stretching has many benefits, there is currently no evidence that stretching before or after exercise helps to reduce or prevent DOMS. Can I continue exercising with DOMS? You can exercise with DOMS, although it may feel uncomfortable, especially during the warm-up phase. You may find the pain goes away during the session but it will return after exercising once your muscles have cooled down. If the pain makes it hard to exercise, then it is advisable to refrain from the activity for a few days until the pain eases. Alternatively, you could focus on exercises targeting less affected muscles to allow the most affected muscle groups time to recover. Will I keep getting DOMS? DOMS is a type of muscle conditioning, which means your muscles are adapting to the new activity. The next time you perform the same activity, or exercise at the same intensity, there will be less muscle tissue damage, less soreness, and a faster recovery. Just one bout of DOMS actually develops a partial protective effect that reduces the chances of developing soreness in that same activity for the following weeks or months.
why do muscles hurt after exercise 1

Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

If your New Year’s resolution to get in shape stalled out fast, you might be panicking right about now since bikini season is right around the bend. Making up for lost time with an aggressive workout routine will likely leave you sore, but begging for more once you see your thighs trim down and take form.That burn you feel 24 to 48 hours after an intense workout is called delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and it’s enough to make you want to put down the Kettlebell and pick up a cocktail. But press on! We talked to fitness and nutrition expert Harley Pasternak, M.Sc., author of The 5-Factor World Diet, and trainer to celebrities like Lady Gaga, Megan Fox, and Halle Berry, about why (some) pain is good.”The idea behind resistance training is that you’re basically tearing something and creating a micro trauma in the muscle,” Pasternak says. “When the muscle recovers, it’s going to recover stronger and denser than it was before.” So that soreness you feel the day after an upper-body workout—when you’re hauling groceries into your car and you can hardly lift your arms—is good.Just make sure what you’re suffering from is DOMS and not an injury.  “A good way to tell the difference is if the pain is bilateral,” Pasternak says. Having one very sore shoulder after you’ve worked both shoulders could spell injury.If you feel normal soreness in a muscle, ligament, or tendon, it’s DOMS and you can continue working out around it, Pasternak says. In the case of arms and shoulders, you can work your quads, abs, or glutes and then move back to your upper body in a few days.To avoid feeling the pain of DOMS the next time around, Pasternak suggests starting your exercise routine slow. “Increase your resistance gradually so that your muscles adapt to your new workout plan.”  He also shared his top four tips to relieve (or avoid) sore muscles, so pain will never be an excuse to skip your workout again—and that’s a good thing!Harley Pasternak Top 4 Tips to Reducing DOMS1. Warm Up. “Increase body temperature to help prepare your muscles for the shock of an intense workout,” Pasternak says.2. Stay Hydrated. “A lack of electrolytes can make muscles sore,” Pasternak says, who recommends drinking easily digested fluids so you can power up and avoid an upset stomach. “Look for beverages with no protein or stimulants like Powerade Zero.” (And steer clear of these 10 worst drinks for your body!)3. Ice Sore Muscles. “Have a cold pack handy to reduce pain and inflammation,” Pasternak says. ACE has an Instant Cold Compress that’s super convenient. “Give it a twist and you’ve got instant ice.”4. Do Cardio. “A cardio workout increases blood flow and acts as a filter system. It brings nutrients like oxygen, protein, and iron to the muscles that you’ve been training and helps them recover faster. As the blood leaves the muscles, it takes some of the metabolic bi-products with it (like carbon dioxide and lactic acid) that may be causing DOMS.” You might also like:•30 Surprising Foods that Keep You Hydrated•Jackie Warner’s Top 10 Diet and Fitness Tips•10 Reasons You Should Work Out with a Personal Trainer
why do muscles hurt after exercise 2

Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

Starting a workout program can be challenging. Making the time to exercise, creating a balanced routine, and setting goals are hard enough, but add to that the muscle soreness that comes with adapting to that regimen, and it may be difficult to stay on track. Chances are, you won’t be leaping out of bed to get to the gym when it hurts to hold your arm up to brush your teeth. After participating in some kind of strenuous physical activity, particularly something new to your body, it is common to experience muscle soreness, say experts. “Muscles go through quite a bit of physical stress when we exercise,” says Rick Sharp, professor of exercise physiology at Iowa State University in Ames. “Mild soreness just a natural outcome of any kind of physical activity,” he says. “And they’re most prevalent in beginning stages of a program.” Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Exercise physiologists refer to the gradually increasing discomfort that occurs between 24 and 48 hours after activity as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and it is perfectly normal. “Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common result of physical activity that stresses the muscle tissue beyond what it is accustomed to,” says David O. Draper, professor and director of the graduate program in sports medicine/athletic training at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. To be more specific, says Draper, who’s also a member of the heat-responsive pain council, delayed onset muscle soreness occurs when the muscle is performing an eccentric or a lengthening contraction. Examples of this would be running downhill or the lengthening portion of a bicep curl. “Small microscopic tears occur in the muscle,” he says. The mild muscle strain injury creates microscopic damage to the muscle fibers. Scientists believe this damage, coupled with the inflammation that accompanies these tears, causes the pain. “The aches and pains should be minor,” says Carol Torgan, an exercise physiologist and fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, “and are simply indications that muscles are adapting to your fitness regimen.” Even Bodybuilders Get Them No one is immune to muscle soreness. Exercise neophytes and body builders alike experience delayed onset muscle soreness.

Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise
Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise
Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise
Why Do Muscles Hurt After Exercise

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*